Gamification in the Pharmaceutical industry EchoRight acceptance model

Pulmonary Hypertension [PH] in the pharmaceutical industry.

Schär, Serge, 2020

Art der Arbeit Bachelor Thesis
Auftraggebende Actelion Pharmaceuticals
Betreuende Dozierende Jacob, Christine
Keywords Gamification, Pharmaceuticals, Pulmonary Hypertension, Technology Acceptance
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In 2019, EchoRight, a gamified app within JnJ was created to further educate cardiologists to detect signs of PH and increase PH awareness. The scope of this paper is based on mobile app technology acceptance and gamification in the pharmaceutical industry
To propose a viable solution for user acceptance, three models are reviewed to gather an understanding of which factors influence acceptance in information systems. Both Technology Acceptance Model [TAM], TAM2 as well as the United Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology [UTAUT] are found to be excellent models in determining the level of system acceptance by users.
A modified version of the TAM2 with key determinants from the Sustainable Gamification for Impact [SGI] has been selected due to the sector, specificity of its user and the type of gamified app EchoRight is. Key factors such as experience, job relevance and perceived usefulness together with the other presented determinants should give a concrete overview of user acceptance for EchoRight. The proposed framework will aid the business in identifying its current user acceptance, therefore, allowing modifications in accordance with the SGI to increase both acceptance and system sustainability.
Studiengang: Business Administration International Management (Bachelor)
Vertraulichkeit: vertraulich
Art der Arbeit
Bachelor Thesis
Auftraggebende
Actelion Pharmaceuticals, Allschwil
Autorinnen und Autoren
Schär, Serge
Betreuende Dozierende
Jacob, Christine
Publikationsjahr
2020
Sprache der Arbeit
Englisch
Vertraulichkeit
vertraulich
Studiengang
Business Administration International Management (Bachelor)
Standort Studiengang
Brugg-Windisch
Keywords
Gamification, Pharmaceuticals, Pulmonary Hypertension, Technology Acceptance